Keep Moving Forward!

Greetings

As we prepare to enter a new season, what are you going to do to make this time in your life meaningful?  Have you planned a much-needed vacation, decided to plant a flower garden, write your memoirs, a novel, short story or even a play?  Have you given any thought to completing a project, your education, starting a hobby, career change, relocating, or even starting a small business?  Now is the time to begin living with purpose and passion and focus on the “unfinished” or begin something new. Create a plan for how you will continue moving forward and several backup plans just in case you have a “just in case moment.” In 1967, the late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. stated

this is the most important and crucial period of your lives, for what you do now and what you decide now at this age may well determine which way your life shall go.  And the question is whether you have a proper, solid, and a sound blueprint. 

Set short and long-term goals, and whatever you decide to pursue, schedule time to work on one of your goals each day, even if you can only spend a half hour doing so. Set a deadline for yourself and work hard to finish on time while maintaining a pace within your comfort range. Time, as you know is precious and priceless, so keep moving forward as you pursue your dreams and achieve goals. Consider undertaking something new and exciting find your passion and pursue it with confidence and great enthusiasm.

Life can be challenging at times and often our plans are detoured for various reasons. The most important thing to remember is to keep moving forward, stay focused and learn how to walk through the shallow, murky and deep waters, while maintaining your balance, focus and vision. If you must move forward taking small steps, then do so, on your time, at your pace and your comfort level. Just keep moving forward!

Remember, you are the master of your destiny, you are in control and know that any setbacks or  curveballs that life may throw your way are “temporary.”  As you move forward, remember to define and determine what success is to you and most importantly, do not allow others to define or determine your success. Take your time, take small steps, believe in yourself, and most importantly, keep moving forward.

John H. Johnson once stated, “if you can somehow think and dream of success in small steps, every time you make a step, every time you accomplish a small goal, it gives you confidence to go on from there.”

Until next week, keep moving forward.

Continued Success!

Dr. Culbreth

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The Difference

My passions in life include being a professor and mentor because both are so deeply ingrained in the inner fabric of my being and come so naturally for me.

You know you left your mark on the lives of your students when they call or send e-mails thanking you for making a difference in their lives. When they ask if you would take them under your wing and serve as their mentor after the class is over, after completing their undergraduate or graduate degrees, or when they ask if you will serve on dissertation committees.

When I receive those e-mails or text messages saying “thank you” for setting the bar high, for encouraging them to continue moving forward on their journey, for helping them to become critical and analytical thinkers, teaching them how to write well, and master the subject matter while helping them develop workforce ready KSA’s, then I have done my job. We are building bridges, relationships and networks that will span lifetimes.

Normally, I am not the “teary-eyed” type, but for some reason, when my current and former students send those “thank you for making a difference in my life” text messages or e-mails, they get to me – and I have to grab a Kleenex.

So, I will continue to give back and be a part of the change needed in academia and in the different communities, serving with a “heart full of grace and a soul generated by love” (King, 1968) because it completes me! I love what I do!

Just wanted to share!

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Call for Anthology Submissions

Anthology Title  

“We, The Excluded People: How Racism in America Defers Dreams and Diminishes Hopes – Momentarily”  

                       

The Journal of Colorism Studies (JOCS) is holding open submissions for essays to be featured in an upcoming anthology titled “We, the Excluded People: How Racism in America Defers Dreams and Diminishes Hopes – Momentarily” edited by Dr. Donnamaria Culbreth.

This anthology is a fundraiser of the Journal of Colorism Studies with all proceeds supporting the Journal of Colorism Studies.

We are interested in well-crafted submissions that focus on how racism in America affects Black Americans. It is through these submissions that we hope to further enlighten society of the detrimental effects of racism on the psychological, emotional, physical, and social well-being and growth of Black Americans in the millennium. Essays should also recommend strategies to address racism in America.

Selected topics are noted below

Submission Guidelines

  • Submit a letter of interest identifying the selected essay category from the attached Essay Categories List.
  • No work may be more than 3500 words. Please watch your word count. Submissions over the word count will be disqualified for this
  • The work must not have appeared in print or online.
  • All submissions must be written in English, include a cover letter containing word count and writing
  • Each author may submit up to two (2) unique
  • Essays must be submitted electronically in Microsoft Word format, Times New Roman 12 point font and double

Author Bios

Submissions should include author biographies not to exceed one paragraph and may include links to personal websites.

 

Submission Deadline

December 31, 2020 by midnight)with a targeted publication date of June 2021.

 

Submissions

Submit documents to: Anthology@jocs.org

 

On behalf of the Journal of Colorism Studies, thank you for your support and submissions.

 

Continued Success!

Dr. Donnamaria Culbreth
Editor-in-Chief
Journal of Colorism Studies

Website: jocsonline.org

Twitter: @ColorismJournal

Essay Categories

 Topics include but are not limited to the following:

 

Black Women

  • Negative stereotypes
  • Employment
  • Leadership
  • Hair
  • Body image
  • Standards of beauty
  • Healthcare
  • Education
  • Respect

 

Black Men

  • Disparate treatment
  • Incarceration
  • Racial profiling
  • Negative stereotypes
  • Employment
  • Education
  • Police brutality
  • Families
  • Opportunities

 

Community

  • Gang violence
  • Shootings
  • Gentrification
  • Neighborhoods
  • Segregation
  • Non-profits and Corporate Social Responsibility
  • Conflict
  • Drugs (crack vs. opioids)
  • Healthy communities
  • Protests/marches

 

Education

  • Quality education
  • The Achievement Gap
  • K-12
  • Higher education
  • Faculty
  • Student learning
  • Advising
  • Racism on campus
  • Racist faculty
  • The purpose of education
  • Low income schools
  • College preparation
  • Student success

 

Employment

  • Equal employment opportunities
  • Hiring/terminations
  • Reporting racism
  • Racism
  • Disparate treatment
  • Promotions
  • Job opportunities
  • Black women in the workplace
  • Inequities in the workplace
  • Careers
  • Exclusion in the workplace
  • Diversity
  • Tolerance as a catalyst
  • Colorism

 

Environmental

  • Environmental racism
  • Air quality
  • Neighborhood contamination
  • Inner cities
  • Flint and the water crisis

 

 Family

  • Extended families
  • Relationships
  • Parenting
  • Saving the children
  • Children/teens
  • Conversations with Black boys/Black girls
  • Family structure
  • Black girls/boys – unique needs/challenges and traumas

 

Government

  • Federal
  • State
  • Local
  • Job training programs
  • Opportunities

 

 Healthcare

  • Healthcare disparities
  • Black women and healthcare
  • Pregnancies and death rates
  • Black men and healthcare
  • COVID-19

 

Historical  (relate to issues in the millennium)

  • Post-slavery
  • Reparations?
  • 400 years
  • Racism in America
  • Reconstruction
  • Civil War
  • Jim Crow
  • The Civil Rights Era
  • Black Power Movement
  • The Deacons of Defense
  • The Black Panthers
  • The Civil Rights Era
  • Racism in the millennium
  • Lynching/murders
  • Emmitt Till in the millennium
  • Boycotts

 

Leadership

  • What would DuBois and Booker T. Washington Do?
  • What would Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcom X Do?
  • Community leaders
  • The opportunists
  • Game changers
  • Leading change

 

Legal/Criminal Justice

  • Criminal justice system
  • Prisons/Incarceration
  • Criminal justice reform
  • Sentencing of Black boys/men/girls/women
  • Jury bias
  • Justice delayed is justice denied

 

 Media

  • Perpetuating racism
  • Unconscious racism
  • Stereotypes
  • Reporting/news

 

Mentoring

  • The lack of inner-city programs
  • Recreational vs. Intellectual programs for inner city Black children
  • Mentoring Black girls/boys

 

Personal

  • Self-esteem
  • Self-love
  • Self-respect
  • Self-identity
  • Self-pride
  • Culture
  • Anger
  • Denial
  • Depression
  • Acceptance
  • Trauma/challenges
  • Trauma (psychological, physical, emotional and social)
  • Burdens of our children
  • Deferred dreams
  • Hope/diminished hope
  • Coping mechanisms
  • Colorism
  • Healing
  • Rising to the top

 

Police and the Community

  • Racial profiling
  • Police and racism
  • Policing black bodies
  • Murder of Black men/boys/women/girls
  • Protests
  • Civil rights
  • Incarceration
  • Prosecuting police officers
  • Conflict and differences
  • Police brutality
  • Police calls (false reporting of Black Americans for unsubstantiated reasons)
  • Colorism
  • Detaining Black men
  • “You fit the description”

 

 Political

  • Democrats
  • Republicans
  • Voting
  • Pandering for the Black vote
  • Promises
  • Agendas

 

 Racism/Institutional Racism

  • Speaking truth to power
  • Racial prejudice
  • Racial disparities
  • Negative stereotypes
  • Prejudice
  • Biasnesses
  • Racial perception gap
  • Education
  • Healthcare
  • Law
  • Employment
  • Financial industry
  • White privilege
  • Racial divide
  • Conscious and unconscious racism
  • Intentional and unintentional racism
  • Overt racism
  • Covert racism
  • Critical race theories
  • Strategies
  • Voices
  • Why we can’t wait
  • Enough

 

Social

  • Relationships
  • Interracial platonic and romantic relationships
  • Value of Black lives
  • Jim Crow in the Millennium
  • Organizations (NAACP, Urban League, etc.)
  • Unity
  • Solidarity
  • Psychic prisons
  • Interracial colorism
  • Voices and being heard
  • Taking a stand
  • Strategies

 

Social Media

  • Online Platforms
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Instagram

 

Socioeconomic

  • Income disparities
  • Small businesses
  • Opportunities
  • Financial
  • Credit
  • Home ownership
  • Mortgages
  • Neighborhoods
  • Housing
  • Black Wall Street in the Millennium

 

 The Black Church

 

 

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Call for Submissions

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New Anthology: “Our Voices Our Stories”

Press Release

NEW ANTHOLOGY ADVANCES, CELEBRATES, EMBRACES AND EMPOWERS GIRLS AND WOMEN OF COLOR.

 

NEW JERSEY. September 1, 2019.  The National Girls and Women of Color Council, Inc. (NGWCC),  a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization in Jersey City announced the publication of their first anthology, “Our Voices Ours Stories: An Anthology of Writings Advancing, Celebrating, Embracing and Empowering Girls and Women of Color.” The edited anthology contains biographies, essays, poems, short stories and other writings authored by girls, teens, women and men of color. The editorial team included Dr. Donnamaria Culbreth, editor, and Dr. Lata Murti and Ms. Lisa Maria Culbreth, assistant editors.

The diverse national and international voices represented in the anthology focus on the psychological, emotional, physical and social issues, traumas and challenges experienced by girls, teens and women of color. The writings will encourage society to understand what it means to be a girl, teen and woman of color living in a society that does not always listen to hear their voices or their stories.

According to Dr. Culbreth, “we are trailblazing a path as torchbearers to change the narrative about the value and importance of the voices and stories of girls, teens and women of color by advancing, celebrating, embracing and empowering them. We are celebrating their lives, their dreams, their aspirations, their voices, their stories, and their will to keep rising to the top despite enduring unique challenges. When we celebrate girls, teens and women of color, we are embracing them and that embrace empowers them to advance and reach for the stars.”

In celebration of the publication of the anthology, NGWCC hosted the “Our Voices Our Stories” talk radio mini-series on Visibility, the official talk radio program of NGWCC. The mini-series consisted of five episodes focusing on the theme of the anthology and guests included authors who contributed to the anthology. The archive of the mini-series is available on NGWCC’s website.

“Our Voices Our Stories” is a fundraiser of NGWCC and is available for purchase on the website of NGWCC

 

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Press Release

NEW ANTHOLOGY ADVANCES, CELEBRATES, EMBRACES AND EMPOWERS GIRLS AND WOMEN OF COLOR.

NEW JERSEY, Jersey City, September 1, 2019.  The National Girls and Women of Color Council, Inc. (NGWCC),  a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization in Jersey City announced the publication of their first anthology, “Our Voices Ours Stories: An Anthology of Writings Advancing, Celebrating, Embracing and Empowering Girls and Women of Color.” The edited anthology contains biographies, essays, poems, short stories and other writings authored by girls, teens, women and men of color. The editorial team included Dr. Donnamaria Culbreth, editor, and Dr. Lata Murti and Ms. Lisa Maria Culbreth, assistant editors.

The diverse national and international voices represented in the anthology focus on the psychological, emotional, physical and social issues, traumas and challenges experienced by girls, teens and women of color. The writings will encourage society to understand what it means to be a girl, teen and woman of color living in a society that does not always listen to hear their voices or their stories.

According to Dr. Culbreth, “we are trailblazing a path as torchbearers to change the narrative about the value and importance of the voices and stories of girls, teens and women of color by advancing, celebrating, embracing and empowering them. We are celebrating their lives, their dreams, their aspirations, their voices, their stories, and their will to keep rising to the top despite enduring unique challenges. When we celebrate girls, teens and women of color, we are embracing them and that embrace empowers them to advance and reach for the stars.”

In celebration of the publication of the anthology, NGWCC hosted the “Our Voices Our Stories” talk radio mini-series on Visibility, the official talk radio program of NGWCC. The mini-series consisted of five episodes focusing on the theme of the anthology and guests included authors who contributed to the anthology. The archive of the mini-series is available on NGWCC’s website.

“Our Voices Our Stories” is a fundraiser of NGWCC and is available for purchase on the website ofNGWCC (http://www.ngwcc.org/anthology.html)

 

 

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What the Health? Women of Color and Healthcare Disparities in the Millennium

via What the Health? Women of Color and Healthcare Disparities in the Millennium

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The Power Within

via The Power Within

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The Power Within

via The Power Within

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On Being Our Sisters’ Keeper

via On Being Our Sisters’ Keeper

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